Sharing Communities

A program for instructors to discuss a topic
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The NTLC's Sharing Communities typically consist of groups of 6-10 instructors who agree to meet three to four times during a semester to investigate a topic, issue or problem related to teaching and learning. The conversations are lively, thought-provoking, and beneficial.

 

2020-2021 Sharing Communities 

Teaching in 2020:  Applied Ethics on Campus/Canvas 

It might be hard to remember that we had a few months of normalcy at the start of 2020. But before we knew it, not only did all faculty have to quickly adjust to teaching all of our courses online we also had many other uncertainties surrounding our lives. This Sharing Community will start out by taking a look back at issues that arose in spring and we will discuss what we would have done differently. We will use some ethical decision-making processes to frame our conversations. At the start of fall, the group will talk about some specific online teaching concerns, such as academic misconduct, course/program integrity and related topics. Later in fall we’ll start to take a closer look at present day situations we and our students are facing. We will start to tackle larger issues that delve into faculty and student interactions and processes. Participants will start thinking about ways we can address timely, yet controversial, topics, such as protests and elections, in our classrooms.

Kate Edenborg, interim director of the Center for Applied Ethics, will facilitate this Sharing Community. The first meeting will be held on Tuesday, Sept. 22 at 12:20-1:15 p.m. in Microsoft Teams. We will plan to meet at least once a month after that. Times and dates will be determined at the first meeting. Contact Kate at edenborgk@uwstout.edu or ext. 1483 if you want to know more.

Register button for  Ethics sharing community

 Click to enroll in Applied Ethics Sharing Community

 

“Me” and White Supremacy Discussions – Sharing Community

This group will use discussion, self-reflection, and the first 83 pages of Layla Saad’s book, me and white supremacy, to explore topics of diversity, equity, and inclusion. With this sharing community as a safe space, we will examine ideas of white privilege, white fragility, tone policing, color blindness, and more. These discussions support Stout’s goals of recruitment and retention of more diverse employees, as well as individuals’ personal and professional goals of improving teaching effectiveness and interactions with students and colleagues outside of the classroom. Books will be provided by NTLC.  Space is limited so please register early at:  

Meeting schedule:  Thursdays: 2:30 - 3:25

  • September 24 - My identities & white privilege presentation
  • October 8 - My identities & white privilege discussion
  • October 22 - White fragility presentation
  • November 5 - White fragility discussion
  • November 19 - Tone policing presentation
  • December 3 - Tone policing discussion
  • December 17 - White silence
  • January 14 - White silence discussion
  • January 28  - White superiority presentation
  • February 11 - White superiority discussion
  • February 25 - White exceptionalism
  • March 11 - White exceptionalism discussion
  • March 25 - Color blindness
  • April 8 - Color blindness discussion
  • April 22 - IDI (tentative) & reflection 
  • May 13 - Debriefing & Next Steps 

Note: the content of some sessions and discussions can be difficult to consider, such as white privilege, paradigms about race,  and identity-based discrimination and harassment. This sharing community is designed to be a place where people engage bravely, honestly, and thoughtfully with challenging ideas.

Registration button for Me and White Supremacy

 Click here to register for "Me" and White Supremacy

 

Small Teaching Online – Sharing Community

As a group, we will share ideas, expertise and questions related to enhancing our knowledge and skills for effectively teaching courses with a full or partially distance-delivered model. We will use Darby’s book Small Teaching Online as a guide for applying learning science in online environments.  The book will be provided by NTLC. 

Sylvia Tiala of the Nakatani Teaching and Learning Center will facilitate this Sharing Community/Community of Practice.  The first meeting will be held on Thursday, Sept. 24 from 9:05 - 10:00 a.m. in Microsoft Teams. We will plan to meet twice a month after that. Times and dates will be determined at the first meeting.  Contact Sylvia Tiala  at tialas@uwstout.edu or ext. 5196 for more information.

Sharing Community Topics:

  • October - Designing for Learning
    • Backward Design
    • Engagement
    • Media & Technology Tools
  • November - Teaching Humans
    • Building Community
    • Giving Feedback
    • Fostering Student Success
  • December
    • Creating Autonomy
    • Making Connections
    • Developing as an Online Instructor

Register for Small Teaching Online

  Click here to register for Small Teaching Sharing Community 

2019-2020 Sharing Communities

Table of Knowledge

Jill Klefstad, School of Education, is continuing to offer this Sharing Community and to provide instructional and non-instructional staff a laid-back, safe and comfortable gathering place to dialogue and share issues related to teaching, learning, and professionalism in higher education. Examples include engaging students, mindfulness, building collaboration across campus, and much more.

Replace Learning Technology Services with this title: Canvas Best Practice Discussion:

Learning Technology Services is working with NTLC to offer a Sharing Community designed to support instructors in advancing their understanding of how to more effectively use Canvas tools. The NTLC Sharing Community encourages faculty to go beyond the basics of Canvas by learning from campus faculty in monthly discussions that showcase how they have creatively designed a course in Canvas and what tools they are using to enhance student understanding. Instructors are learning how to use Canvas in unique ways!

2018-2019 Sharing Communities

Table of Knowledge

Jill Klefstad, School of Education, facilitated the bimonthly conversations to provide instructional and non-instructional staff a laid-back, safe and comfortable gathering place to dialogue and share issues related to teaching, learning, and professionalism in higher education. Examples included engaged students, mindfulness, building collaboration across campus, and much more.

Online Teaching Pedagogy

Marya Wilson, Operations and Management, facilitated the Online Teaching Pedagogy Sharing Community for the academic year. The group met once a month via Skype for Business. This was a very casual one-hour conversation about ways to be more effective online teachers. This was an important campus discussion given our LSM conversion. 

2017-2018 Sharing Communities

Table of Knowledge

Jill Klefstad, School of Education, facilitated the bimonthly conversations to provide instructional and non-instructional staff a laid-back, safe and comfortable gathering place to dialogue and share issues related to teaching, learning, and professionalism in higher education. Examples included engaged students, mindfulness, building collaboration across campus, and much more.

Table of Knowledge Flyer

2016-2017 Sharing Communities

Online Pedagogy Conversations in Higher Education

Marya Wilson, Operations and Management, facilitated the Online Teaching Pedagogy Sharing Community for the academic year. The group met once a month via Skype for Business. This was a very casual one-hour conversation about ways to be more effective online teachers. This was an important campus discussion given our LSM conversion.

Table of Knowledge

Jill Klefstad, School of Education, facilitated the bimonthly conversations to provide instructional and non-instructional staff a laid-back, safe and comfortable gathering place to dialogue and share issues related to teaching, learning, and professionalism in higher education. Examples included engaged students, mindfulness, building collaboration across campus, and much more.

Teaching and Learning with Geo-spatial Information Systems and Technologies

Innisfree Mckinnon, Social Sciences, served as the facilitator. Information

2015-2016 Sharing Communities

Online Pedagogy in Higher Education

Marya Wilson, Operations and Management, facilitated the Online Teaching Pedagogy Sharing Community for the academic year. The group met once a month via Skype for Business. This was a very casual one-hour conversation about ways to be more effective online teachers. This was an important campus discussion given our LSM conversion.

2014-2015 Sharing Communities

Online Pedagogy in Higher Education

Marya Wilson, Operations and Management, facilitated the Online Teaching Pedagogy Sharing Community for the academic year. The group met once a month via Skype for Business. This was a very casual one-hour conversation about ways to be more effective online teachers. This was an important campus discussion given our LSM conversion.

2012-2013 Sharing Communities

Exploring Racism, Colonialism and Empire

Virginia Lea, School of Education, facilitated a group dialogue for faculty and instructional staff to generate ideas that were used to develop a new course design to enhance Stout students' critical awareness of impact of racism, colonialism and empire on socioeconomic, political, cultural and educational arrangements worldwide - particularly on the lives of current and historically displaced and exiled young people and their families.

Teaching Strategies: Even More Ways to Engage Students and Assess Learning

Deanna Schultz, School of Education, facilitated the group.

2011-2012 Sharing Communities

Brochure of Sharing Communities

Critical Friends: A Collegial Review of Each Other’s Assignments

This community was inspired by an article that appeared in the Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development, entitled, "Critical Friends." The author, Deborah Bambino, wrote about how she and a group of her colleagues met monthly to examine student work and their own work. Their intentions, through working and supporting each other, was to improve the day-to-day learning of their students and to enhance their teaching excellence. Lorraine Mitchel, English and Philosophy, facilitated discussions with colleagues at UW-Stout with an active exchange of feedback and a supportive culture.

Learning Objectives Based Assessment (LOBA)

Todd Zimmerman, Physics, facilitated group discussions for people interested in finding out more as well as those who had started to implement the shift of focus from having students acquire enough points to get an "A" to getting students to become proficient in learning the course subject matter. A key component of this concept was to allow students to reassess on learning objectives at a later date to give an incentive to learn the material they may not have mastered earlier on.

Teaching Circle

Georgios Loizides, Social Sciences, facilitated a community for faculty members to discuss issues relating to teaching and learning in general. A few topics the group discussed in the past included ways to increase student engagement, successful strategies for the use of laptops in the classroom, and matching teaching schedules to instructor personality.

Exploring Racism, Colonialism and Empire

Virginia Lea, School of Education, facilitated a group dialogue for faculty and instructional staff to generate ideas that were used to develop a new course design to enhance Stout students' critical awareness of impact of racism, colonialism and empire on socioeconomic, political, cultural and educational arrangements worldwide - particularly on the lives of current and historically displaced and exiled young people and their families.

2010-2011 Sharing Communities

Mothers and Academia

In 2010, the Mothers and Academic Sharing Community began. This community allowed mothers who were in academics share their experiences and learn strategies to balance their demanding roles. Participants read articles, watched documentaries, listened to speakers and discussed issues that were impacting their daily lives. Maleka (Polly) Hashmi facilitated the group, which helped members create a nurturing environment that encouraged women across the campus to openly discuss topics they were concerned about. Lopa Basu, English and Philosophy, Glendali Rodriguez, Construction, Glenda Jones, English and Philosophy, and Julie Watts, English and Philosophy, served as co-facilitators.

Teaching Circle

Georgios Loizides, Social Sciences, facilitated a community for faculty members to discuss issues relating to teaching and learning in general.